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Major Achievements(2)

d3downunder.com Card Players (1890-92)
In this painting, the upward curvature of the players' backs creates a sense of architectural solidity and thrust, and the intervals between figures and objects have the appearance of live cells of space and atmosphere.
Hillside in Provence (probably about 1886-90)
While the specific hillside in Czanne's native Provence has not been conclusively identified, the wall of angular, jutting rock formations in this painting may represent a quarry, with the cuttings revealing geological strata.

Stylistically, the painting relates to landscapes that Czanne was painting around Aix-en-Provence in the mid-1880s.
An Old Woman with a Rosary (probably 1896)
According to the poet and writer Joachim Gasquet, the sitter in this painting was a former nun who had escaped from a convent and had wandered aimlessly until the painter took her on as a servant.

Gasquet found this painting in 1896 at Czanne's family house near Aix-en-Provence , lying on the floor of the artist's studio with a pipe dripping on it. The lower left hand corner is marked by splashed water or steam.
Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses) (about 1900-6)
Czanne painted bathers from the 1870s onwards, including numerous compositions of male and female bathers, singly or in groups. Late in life, he painted three large-scale female bather groups. In addition to the National Gallery's painting, they are now in the Barnes Foundation, Merion , PA , and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. He seems to have been at work on all three simultaneously at the time of his death.

In such works, Czanne was reinterpreting a long tradition of paintings with nude figures in the landscape by artists such as Titian and Poussin. While the subjects of their works were taken from classical myths, Czanne did not use direct literary sources. Instead his central theme was the harmony of the figures with the landscape expressed through solid forms, strict architectonic structure, and the earth tones of the bodies. When exhibited in 1907, this painting became an inspiration for the nascent Cubist movement; both Picasso and Matisse took a strong interest in it.